XAS studies of the effectiveness of iron chelating treatments of Mary Rose timbers

Berko, A., Smith, A.D., Jones, A.M., Schofield, E.J., Mosselmans, J.F.W., Chadwick, A.V. (2009) XAS studies of the effectiveness of iron chelating treatments of Mary Rose timbers. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 190 . p. 12147. ISSN 1742-6588. (doi:10.1088/1742-6596/190/1/012147) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/190/1/012147

Abstract

The oxidation of sulfur in marine archaeological timbers under museum storage conditions is a recently identified problem, particularly for major artefacts such as historic ships excavated from the seabed. Recent work on the Vasa has stressed the role of iron in catalysing the oxidative degradation of the wood cellulose and the polyethylene glycols used to restore mechanical integrity to the timbers. In developing new treatment protocols for the long term preservation of Henry VIII of England's flagship, the Mary Rose, we are investigating the potential of chelating agents to neutralise and remove the iron products from the ships timbers. We have explored the use of aqueous solutions of chelating agents of calcium phytate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and ammonium citrate to extract the iron compounds. All of these solutions exhibit some level of iron removal; however the key is to find the most effective concentration at pH of around 7 of the reagent solution, to minimise the treatment time and find the most cost-effective treatment for the whole of the Mary Rose hull. Fe K-edge XAFS data from samples of Mary Rose timbers, before and after treatment by the chelating agents mentioned has been collected. The data collected provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of the treatment solutions. © 2009 IOP Publishing Ltd.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1088/1742-6596/190/1/012147
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: C7 - 012147 [EPrints field already has value set] LA - English [Field not mapped to EPrints] J2 - J. Phys. Conf. Ser. [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, CT2 7NR, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Mary Rose Trust, HM Naval Base, Portsmouth PO1 3LX, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] DB - Scopus [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry > QD478 Solid State Chemistry
Q Science > QD Chemistry > Analytical Chemistry
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Functional Materials Group
Depositing User: Giles Tarver
Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2015 11:47 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 15:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50185 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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