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An X-ray micro-fluorescence study to investigate the distribution of Al, Si, P and Ca ions in the surrounding soft tissue after implantation of a calcium phosphate-mullite ceramic composite in a rabbit animal model

Martin, R.A., Jaffer, Z., Tripathi, G., Nath, S., Mohanty, M., Fitzgerald, Victoria, Lagarde, P., Flank, A.-M., Stamboulis, A., Basu, B. and others. (2011) An X-ray micro-fluorescence study to investigate the distribution of Al, Si, P and Ca ions in the surrounding soft tissue after implantation of a calcium phosphate-mullite ceramic composite in a rabbit animal model. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 22 (11). pp. 2537-2543. ISSN 0957-4530. (doi:10.1007/s10856-011-4428-y) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-011-4428-y

Abstract

Synthetic calcium phosphates, despite their bioactivity, are brittle. Calcium phosphate- mullite composites have been suggested as potential dental and bone replacement materials which exhibit increased toughness. Aluminium, present in mullite, has however been linked to bone demineralisation and neurotoxicity: it is therefore important to characterise the materials fully in order to understand their in vivo behaviour. The present work reports the compositional mapping of the interfacial region of a calcium phosphate-20 wt% mullite biocomposite/soft tissue interface, obtained from the samples implanted into the long bones of healthy rabbits according to standard protocols (ISO-10993) for up to 12 weeks. X-ray micro-fluorescence was used to map simultaneously the distribution of Al, P, Si and Ca across the ceramic-soft tissue interface. A well defined and sharp interface region was present between the ceramic and the surrounding soft tissue for each time period examined. The concentration of Al in the surrounding tissue was found to fall by two orders of magnitude, to the background level, within ~35 μm of the implanted ceramic. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s10856-011-4428-y
Uncontrolled keywords: Animal model, Background level, Biocomposite, Bone replacement materials, Ceramic composites, Compositional mapping, Demineralisation, In-vivo, Interfacial region, Long bone, Neurotoxicity, Orders of magnitude, Sharp interface, Soft tissue, Standard protocols, Time-periods, Tissue interface, Aluminum, Bone, Calcium, Ceramic materials, Dental composites, Fluorescence, Mullite, Silicate minerals, Tissue, Calcium phosphate, aluminum, calcium, calcium phosphate ceramic, silicon, animal experiment, animal tissue, article, bone demineralization, bone remodeling, bone turnover, composite graft, controlled study, in vivo study, long bone, neurotoxicity, nonhuman, priority journal, soft tissue, X ray diffraction, X ray fluorescence, Aluminum Silicates, Animals, Biocompatible Materials, Calcium Phosphates, Ceramics, Electron Probe Microanalysis, Materials Testing, Metals, Prostheses and Implants, Rabbits, Time, Animalia, Oryctolagus cuniculus
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Functional Materials Group
Depositing User: Giles Tarver
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2015 08:08 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49923 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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