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Degradation in Probability Logic : When more Information Leads to Less Precise Conclusions

Wallmann, Christian, Kleiter, Gernot (2014) Degradation in Probability Logic : When more Information Leads to Less Precise Conclusions. Kybernetika, 50 (2). pp. 268-283. ISSN 0023-5954. (doi:10.14736/kyb-2014-2-0268) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://doi.org/10.14736/kyb-2014-2-0268

Abstract

Probability logic studies the properties resulting from the probabilistic interpretation of logical argument forms. Typical examples are probabilistic Modus Ponens and Modus Tollens. Argument forms with two premises usually lead from precise probabilities of the premises to imprecise or interval probabilities of the conclusion. In the contribution, we study generalized inference forms having three or more premises. Recently, Gilio has shown that these generalized forms ``degrade'' -- more premises lead to more imprecise conclusions, i. e., to wider intervals. We distinguish different forms of degradation. We analyse Predictive Inference, Modus Ponens, Bayes' Theorem, and Modus Tollens. Special attention is devoted to the case where the conditioning events have zero probabilities. Finally, we discuss the relation of degradation to monotonicity.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.14736/kyb-2014-2-0268
Uncontrolled keywords: probability logic, generalized inference forms, degradation, total evidence, coherence, probabilistic Modus Tollens
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BC Logic
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > Philosophy
Depositing User: Fiona Godfrey
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2015 15:34 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49891 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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