Sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine Regulate type 1 Fimbriae Synthesis.

Blomfield, Ian C. (2015) Sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine Regulate type 1 Fimbriae Synthesis. Microbiology Spectrum, 3 (3). ISSN 2165-0497. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1128/microbiolspec.MBP-0015-2014) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://doi.org/10.1128/microbiolspec.MBP-0015-2014

Abstract

Type 1 fimbriae of E. coli, a chaperon-usher bacterial adhesin, are synthesized by the majority of strains of the bacterium. Although frequently produced by commensal strains, the adhesin is nevertheless a virulence factor in Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). The role of the adhesin in pathogenesis is best understood in Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Host attachment and invasion by type 1 fimbriate bacteria activates inflammatory pathways, with TLR4 signaling playing a predominant role. In a mouse model of cystitis, type 1 fimbriation not only enhances UPEC adherence to the surface of superficial umbrella cells of the bladder urothelium, but is both necessary and sufficient for their invasion. Moreover the adhesin plays a role in the formation of transient intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) within the cytoplasm of urothelial cells as part of UPEC cycles of invasion. The expression of type 1 fimbriation is controlled by phase variation at the transcriptional level, a mode of gene regulation in which bacteria switch reversibly between fimbriate and afimbriate phases. Phase variation has been widely considered to be a mechanism enabling immune evasion. Notwithstanding the apparently random nature of phase variation, switching of type 1 fimbrial expression is nevertheless controlled by a range of environmental signals that include the amino sugars sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Sialic acid plays a pivotal role in innate immunity, including signaling by the toll-like receptors. Here how sialic acid and GlcNAc control type 1 fimbriation is described and the potential significance of this regulatory response is discussed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Sue Davies
Date Deposited: 27 Jul 2015 11:05 UTC
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2015 08:08 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49842 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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