Fibre Bragg gratings sensor for monitoring distance changes between structural elements inside a building

Smeu, E. and Gnewuch, H. and Jackson, David A. and Podoleanu, Adrian G.H. (2006) Fibre Bragg gratings sensor for monitoring distance changes between structural elements inside a building. In: Tomanek, Pavel and Hrabovsky, Miroslav and Miler, Miroslav and Senderakova, Dagmar, eds. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Spie-Int Soc Optical Engineering (doi:https://doi.org/10.1117/12.675645) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.675645

Abstract

The distance changes between structural elements inside a building (e.g. walls, pillars, stairs, etc.) ought to be monitored, especially in seismic-prone areas, in order to assess its stability. Fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are now the most interesting choice for this purpose, since several gratings can be included in the fibre, resulting in a quasi-distributed sensor, which can be illuminated using a single light source and interrogated simply by a single optical spectrum analyzer (OSA), using wavelength multiplexing. The paper deals with such a sensor, which was installed for monitoring the distance changes in a construction joint between two building blocks inside the University "Politehnica" of Bucharest. Since this city is placed in a seismic-prone area, we use a fast scanning OSA, so that the dynamic behavior of the monitored construction joint is expected to be captured during future earthquakes. Slow drifts of the construction joint width will be also monitored. The paper describes the sensor structure and working principle, the experimental tests and main parameters evaluation. The reported sensor is temperature compensated. It has an estimated distance resolution better or equal to 10 μm, and a linearity of+0.2%...-0.35% for displacements up to 0.55 mm. Simulated dynamic tests are also reported.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Proceeding)
Uncontrolled keywords: Dynamic tests, FBG, Linearity, Resolution, Sensitivity, Strain, Structural monitoring, Temperature compensation, Buildings, Earthquakes, Fiber Bragg gratings, Optical resolving power, Spectrum analyzers, Strain, Wavelength division multiplexing, Dynamic tests, Linearity, Sensitivity, Structural monitoring, Temperature compensation, Fiber optic sensors
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QC Physics
T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General) > TA1520 Optical Engineering
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Applied Optics Group
Depositing User: Giles Tarver
Date Deposited: 24 Jul 2015 14:54 UTC
Last Modified: 27 Jul 2015 13:45 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49754 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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