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It pays to be nice, but not really nice: Asymmetric evaluations of prosociality across seven cultures.

Klein, Nadav, Grossman, Igor, Uskul, Ayse K., Kraus, Alexandra, Epley, Nicolas (2015) It pays to be nice, but not really nice: Asymmetric evaluations of prosociality across seven cultures. Judgment and Decision Making, 10 . pp. 355-364.

Abstract

Cultures differ in many important ways, but one trait appears to be universally valued: prosociality. For one’s reputation, around the world, it pays to be nice to others. However, recent research with American participants finds that evaluations of prosocial actions are asymmetric—relatively selfish actions are evaluated according to the magnitude of selfishness but evaluations of relatively generous actions are less sensitive to magnitude. Extremely generous actions are judged roughly as positively as modestly generous actions, but extremely selfish actions are judged much more negatively than modestly selfish actions (Klein & Epley, 2014). Here we test whether this asymmetry in evaluations of prosociality is culture-specific. Across 7 countries, 1,240 participants evaluated actors giving various amounts of money to a stranger. Along with relatively minor cross-cultural differences in evaluations of generous actions, we find cross-cultural similarities in the asymmetry in evaluations of prosociality. We discuss implications for how reputational inferences can enable the cooperation necessary for successful societies.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Ayse K. Uskul
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2015 20:17 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:50 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49517 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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