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An efficient and modular route to sequence-defined polymers appended to DNA

Edwardson, T.G.W., Carneiro, K.M.M., Serpell, C.J., Sleiman, H.F. (2014) An efficient and modular route to sequence-defined polymers appended to DNA. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 53 (18). pp. 4567-4571. ISSN 1433-7851. (doi:10.1002/anie.201310937) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:49478)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1002/anie.201310937

Abstract

Inspired by biological polymers, sequence-controlled synthetic polymers are highly promising materials that integrate the robustness of synthetic systems with the information-derived activity of biological counterparts. Polymer-biopolymer conjugates are often targeted to achieve this union; however, their synthesis remains challenging. We report a stepwise solid-phase approach for the generation of completely monodisperse and sequence-defined DNA-polymer conjugates using readily available reagents. These polymeric modifications to DNA display self-assembly and encapsulation behavior - as evidenced by HPLC, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence studies - which is highly dependent on sequence order. The method is general and has the potential to make DNA-polymer conjugates and sequence-defined polymers widely available. Bilingual: A stepwise solid-phase synthesis approach provides easy access to sequence-controlled polymers attached to DNA. Polymers with the same molecular composition but different monomer patterns exhibit different amphiphilic self-assembly. The DNA component still retains base-pairing fidelity, and thus one molecule "speaks" two orthogonal and programmable assembly languages. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/anie.201310937
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: LA - English [Field not mapped to EPrints] J2 - Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. [Field not mapped to EPrints] C2 - 24677769 [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Department of Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, QC H3A 0B8, Canada [Field not mapped to EPrints] DB - Scopus [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Uncontrolled keywords: Functional Materials Group, amphiphiles, DNA, polymers, self-assembly, solid-phase synthesis, Amphiphiles, Biopolymers, DNA, Self assembly, Biological polymers, Fluorescence studies, Molecular compositions, Mono-disperse, Programmable Assembly, Solid phase synthesis, Synthetic polymers, Synthetic systems, Polymers, biomaterial, DNA, polymer, atomic force microscopy, chemical structure, chemistry, high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, metabolism, solid phase synthesis, Biocompatible Materials, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, DNA, Microscopy, Atomic Force, Models, Molecular, Molecular Structure, Polymers, Solid-Phase Synthesis Techniques, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Functional Materials Group
Depositing User: Giles Tarver
Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2015 15:52 UTC
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2020 12:13 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49478 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Serpell, C.J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2848-9077
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