Own- and Other-Race Face Identity Recognition in Children: The Effects of Pose and Feature Composition

Anzures, Gizelle, Kelly, David J., Pascalis, Oliver, Quinn, Paul C., Slater, Alan M., de Vivies, Xavier, Lee, Kang (2014) Own- and Other-Race Face Identity Recognition in Children: The Effects of Pose and Feature Composition. Developmental Psychology, 50 (2). pp. 469-481. ISSN 0012-1649. (doi:10.1037/a0033166) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0033166

Abstract

We used a matching-to-sample task and manipulated facial pose and feature composition to examine the other-race effect (ORE) in face identity recognition between 5 and 10 years of age. Overall, the present findings provide a genuine measure of own- and other-race face identity recognition in children that is independent of photographic and image processing. The current study also confirms the presence of an ORE in children as young as 5 years of age using a recognition paradigm that is sensitive to their developing cognitive abilities. In addition, the present findings show that with age, increasing experience with familiar classes of own-race faces and further lack of experience with unfamiliar classes of other-race faces serves to maintain the ORE between 5 and 10 years of age rather than exacerbate the effect. All age groups also showed a differential effect of stimulus facial pose in their recognition of the internal regions of own- and other-race faces. Own-race inner faces were remembered best when three-quarter poses were used during familiarization and frontal poses were used during the recognition test. In contrast, other-race inner faces were remembered best when frontal poses were used during familiarization and three-quarter poses were used during the recognition test. Thus, children encode and/or retrieve own- and other-race faces from memory in qualitatively different ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1037/a0033166
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: David Kelly
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2015 08:05 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:42 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49019 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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