Own- and Other-Race Face Identity Recognition in Children: The Effects of Pose and Feature Composition

Anzures, Gizelle and Kelly, David J. and Pascalis, Oliver and Quinn, Paul C. and Slater, Alan M. and de Vivies, Xavier and Lee, Kang (2014) Own- and Other-Race Face Identity Recognition in Children: The Effects of Pose and Feature Composition. Developmental Psychology, 50 (2). pp. 469-481. ISSN 0012-1649. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0033166) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0033166

Abstract

We used a matching-to-sample task and manipulated facial pose and feature composition to examine the other-race effect (ORE) in face identity recognition between 5 and 10 years of age. Overall, the present findings provide a genuine measure of own- and other-race face identity recognition in children that is independent of photographic and image processing. The current study also confirms the presence of an ORE in children as young as 5 years of age using a recognition paradigm that is sensitive to their developing cognitive abilities. In addition, the present findings show that with age, increasing experience with familiar classes of own-race faces and further lack of experience with unfamiliar classes of other-race faces serves to maintain the ORE between 5 and 10 years of age rather than exacerbate the effect. All age groups also showed a differential effect of stimulus facial pose in their recognition of the internal regions of own- and other-race faces. Own-race inner faces were remembered best when three-quarter poses were used during familiarization and frontal poses were used during the recognition test. In contrast, other-race inner faces were remembered best when frontal poses were used during familiarization and three-quarter poses were used during the recognition test. Thus, children encode and/or retrieve own- and other-race faces from memory in qualitatively different ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: David Kelly
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2015 08:05 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2015 08:14 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/49019 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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