Suppressing Unwanted Autobiographical Memories Reduces Their Automatic Influences: Evidence from Electrophysiology and an Implicit Autobiographical Memory Test

Hu, Xiaoqing and Bergström, Zara M and Bodenhausen, Galen V and Rosenfeld, J Peter (2015) Suppressing Unwanted Autobiographical Memories Reduces Their Automatic Influences: Evidence from Electrophysiology and an Implicit Autobiographical Memory Test. Psychological Science, . ISSN 1467-9280. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797615575734) (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797615575734

Abstract

The present study investigated the extent to which people can suppress unwanted autobiographical memories in a mock crime memory detection context. Participants encoded sensorimotor-rich memories by enacting a lab crime (stealing a ring) and received direct suppression instructions so as to evade guilt detection in a brainwave-based concealed information test. Aftereffects of suppression on automatic memory processes were measured in an autobiographical implicit association test (aIAT). Results showed that suppression attenuated brainwave activity (P300) that is associated with crime-relevant memory retrieval, rendering innocent and guilty/suppression participants indistinguishable. However, guilty/suppression and innocent participants could nevertheless be discriminated via the late posterior negative slow wave, which may reflect the need to monitor response conflict arising between voluntary suppression and automatic recognition processes. Lastly, extending recent findings that suppression can impair implicit memory processes; we provide novel evidence that suppression reduces automatic cognitive biases that are otherwise associated with actual autobiographical memories.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: memory suppression memory detection autobiographical memory P300 autobiographical Implicit Association Test neuroscience and law open data open materials
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Zara Bergstrom
Date Deposited: 28 May 2015 12:30 UTC
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2017 15:05 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48675 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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