Charitable giving and lay morality: understanding sympathy, moral evaluations and social positions

Sanghera, Balihar (2016) Charitable giving and lay morality: understanding sympathy, moral evaluations and social positions. The Sociological Review, 64 (2). pp. 294-311. ISSN 0038-0261. E-ISSN 1467-954X. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-954X.12332) (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-954X.12332

Abstract

Charitable giving and lay morality: understanding sympathy, moral evaluations and social positions Abstract This paper examines how charitable giving offers an example of lay morality, reflecting people’s capacity for fellow-feeling, moral sentiments, personal reflexivity, ethical dispositions, moral norms and moral discourses. Lay morality refers to how people should treat others and be treated by them, matters that are important for their subjective and objective well-being. It is a first person evaluative relation to the world (about things that matter to people). While the paper is sympathetic to the ‘moral boundaries’ approach, which seeks to address the neglect of moral evaluations in sociology, it reveals this approach to have some shortcomings. The paper argues that although morality is always mediated by cultural discourses and shaped by structural factors, it also has a universalising character because people have fellow-feelings, shared human conditions, and have reason to value.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Keywords: charitable giving, lay morality, sympathy, reflexivity, social inequalities
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Medway
Depositing User: Annikki Laitinen
Date Deposited: 22 May 2015 15:02 UTC
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2018 14:44 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48612 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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