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Enhancing ecosystem restoration efficiency through spatial and temporal coordination

Neeson, T.M., Ferris, M.C., Diebel, M.W., Doran, P.J., O'Hanley, J.R., McIntyre, P.B. (2015) Enhancing ecosystem restoration efficiency through spatial and temporal coordination. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 112 (19). pp. 6236-6241. E-ISSN 1091-6490. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

In many large ecosystems, conservation projects are selected by a diverse set of actors operating independently at spatial scales

inefficient means of achieving large-scale objectives if piecemeal efforts are poorly coordinated. Here, we assess the value of

is a leading driver of declining biodiversity and ecosystem services in rivers worldwide, and we simultaneously evaluate optimal barrier removal strategies for 661 tributary rivers of the Laurentian Great Lakes, which are fragmented by at least 6,692 dams and 232,068 road crossings.We find that coordinating barrier removals across the entire basin is nine times more efficient at reconnecting fish to headwater breeding grounds than optimizing independently for each watershed. Similarly, a one-time pulse of restoration investment is up to 10 times more efficient than annual allocations totaling the same amount. Despite widespread emphasis on dams as key barriers in river networks, improving road culvert passability is also essential for efficiently restoring connectivity to the Great Lakes. Our results highlight the dramatic economic and ecological advantages of coordinating efforts in both space and time during restoration of large ecosystems.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HA Statistics > HA33 Management Science
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Management Science
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Centre for Logistics and Heuristic Organisation (CLHO)
Depositing User: Jesse O'Hanley
Date Deposited: 21 May 2015 14:49 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:12 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48600 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
O'Hanley, J.R.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3522-8585
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