Skip to main content

Computers and the changing skill-intensity of jobs.

Green, Francis, Felstead, Alan, Gallie, Duncan (2003) Computers and the changing skill-intensity of jobs. Applied Economics, 35 (14). pp. 1561-1576. ISSN 0003-6846. (doi:10.1081/0003684032000085986) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:4858)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1081/0003684032000085986

Abstract

Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of computer usage at work and other job features on the changing skills required of workers. It compare skills utilization in Britain at three data points: 1986, 1992 and 1997, using proxies for the level of skills actually used in jobs. This study questions the validity of investigating the facts about, and the sources of, rising skills by using just educational attainment or occupational grouping data. This paper finds that:

Using the qualification held or occupation as a skills measure can lead to erroneous conclusions as to the origin of skills changes.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1081/0003684032000085986
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Economics
Depositing User: G.F. Green
Date Deposited: 02 Sep 2008 17:07 UTC
Last Modified: 28 May 2019 13:40 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4858 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):