Gross Efficiency During Flat and Uphill Cycling in Field Conditions

Nimmerichter, Alfred and Prinz, Bernhard and Haselsberger, Kevin and Novak, Nina and Simon, Dieter and Hopker, James G. (2015) Gross Efficiency During Flat and Uphill Cycling in Field Conditions. International journal of sports physiology and performance, 10 (7). pp. 830-834. ISSN 1555-0265. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2014-0373) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2014-0373

Abstract

PURPOSE Whilst a number of studies investigated gross efficiency (GE) in laboratory conditions, few studies have analyzed GE in field conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of gradient and cadence on GE in field conditions. METHODS Thirteen trained cyclists (mean ± SD age: 23.3 ± 4.1 years; stature: 177.0 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 69.0 ± 7.2 kg; VO2max 68.4 ± 5.1 mL·min-1·kg-1) completed an incremental graded exercise test to determine the ventilatory threshold (VT) and 4 field trials of 6 min duration at 90% of VT on flat (1.1%) and uphill terrain (5.1%) with two different cadences (60 and 90 rev·min-1). Oxygen uptake was measured with a portable gas analyzer and power output was controlled with a mobile power crank, which was mounted on a 26-inch mountain bike. RESULTS GE was significantly affected by cadence (20.6 ± 1.7% vs. 18.1 ± 1.3% at 60 and 90 rev·min-1, respectively; P<0.001) and terrain (20.0 ± 1.5% vs. 18.7 ± 1.7% at flat and uphill cycling, respectively; P=0.029). The end-exercise oxygen uptake was 2536 ± 352 mL·min-1 and 2594 ± 329 mL·min-1 for flat and uphill cycling, respectively (P=0.489). There was a significant difference in end-exercise oxygen uptake between the 60 (2352 ± 193 mL·min-1) and the 90 rev·min-1 (2778 ± 431 mL·min-1) (P<0.001). CONCLUSION This findings support previous laboratory based studies demonstrating reductions in GE with increasing cadence and gradient that might be attributed to changes in muscle activity pattern.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: climbing, field cycling, cadence, power output, SRM, cycling performance
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1235 Physiology of sports
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: James Hopker
Date Deposited: 19 May 2015 18:58 UTC
Last Modified: 11 Dec 2015 14:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48577 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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