The relationship between top-down attentional control and changes in weight

Hotham, Sarah, Sharma, Dinkar (2015) The relationship between top-down attentional control and changes in weight. Eating Behaviours, 18 . pp. 81-83. ISSN 1471-0153. E-ISSN 1873-7358. (doi:10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.03.014) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.03.014

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the relationship between top-down attentional control in the presence of food cues and weight change over a 3-month period. Method: A Stroop task adapted to include background images of high-fat food and neutral items was completed by participants (N= 60). Top-down attentional control was assessed by adaptation effects (Stroop effect is smaller when the previous trial is incongruent). To assess weight change, measurements were taken immediately after the Stroop task (T1) and again 3- months later (T2). Differences in weight between T1 and T2 were calculated and three groups formed: weight gain (n=20); weight loss (n =20); no change in weight (n=20). Results: Differences in top-down attentional control were observed according to weight change. Participants who demonstrated reduced top-down attentional control also exhibited changes in weight (both loss and gain) over the 3-months. In contrast, the weight of participants who maintained top-down attentional control in the Stroop task remained stable. Conclusions: Findings suggest attentional control may have a role to play in actual eating behavior. Individuals who demonstrated reduced levels across of top-down attentional control also experienced changes in their weight over the 3-month period. Whether individuals lost or gained weight attentional control was reduced. This reduction was, however, not specific to high-fat food cues, but a general reduction in attentional control across both image conditions.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.03.014
Uncontrolled keywords: Stroop; attentional control; weight change; dieting; food cues
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA784 Nutrition
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Sarah Hotham
Date Deposited: 12 May 2015 08:52 UTC
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2019 10:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48372 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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