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Are high fluoride levels in drinking water associated with hypothyroidism prevalence in England?

Spencer, Sarah, Lowery, David, Peckham, Stephen (2014) Are high fluoride levels in drinking water associated with hypothyroidism prevalence in England? In: ISEE-EUROPE 2014 Young Researchers Conference on Environmental Epidemiology, 20-12 October 2014, Barcelona. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:48365)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

Background and aims

The aim of this study was to examine whether there are differences in the prevalence of

drinking water.

We used a cross-sectional study design using secondary data to develop a linear regression model of

water, hypothyroidism prevalence data, the proportion of registered patients that were female and

of GP practices in areas with fluoride levels ?0.7mg/l to those with fluoride levels <0.3mg/l. We also

West Midlands Metropolitan County, a wholly fluoridated area; and Greater Manchester, a nonfluoridated

Results

the linear regression model. The model accounted for 52% of the observed variance and was

controlling for age and gender. The comparison of high and low fluoride areas showed a significantly

West Midlands Metropolitan County and Greater Manchester showed a higher mean practice level

significant.

The findings of the study show that higher levels of fluoride in drinking water are associated with a

confirmation of the findings of previous studies suggesting that ingestion of fluoride suppresses

thyroid function.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Speech)
Uncontrolled keywords: Hypothyroidism, thyroid function, fluoride, drinking water, artificial fluoridation
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R729 Types of medical practice > R729.5.G4 General practice
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Stephen Peckham
Date Deposited: 11 May 2015 11:23 UTC
Last Modified: 06 May 2020 03:12 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48365 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Spencer, Sarah: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2396-5329
Peckham, Stephen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7002-2614
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