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Determining productivity of Maui Parrotbills, an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper

Mounce, Hanna L., Leonard, David L., Swinnerton, Kirsty J., Becker, C. Dustin, Berthold, Laura K., Iknayan, Kelly J., Groombridge, Jim J. (2013) Determining productivity of Maui Parrotbills, an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper. Journal of Field Ornithology, 84 (1). pp. 32-39. ISSN 0273-8570. (doi:10.1111/jofo.12003) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://doi.org/10.1111/jofo.12003

Abstract

Maui Parrotbills (Pseudonestor xanthophrys), critically endangered Hawaiian honeycreepers endemic to the island of Maui, are restricted to a single population of ?500 individuals located in remote, mountainous terrain. From January to June 2006–2011, we located nests and fledglings in the Hanawi Natural Area Reserve (NAR) in east Maui, Hawaii, to document nest success and annual reproductive success. Nest success is a commonly used measure of productivity and is a central component of many demographic studies. Annual reproductive success is less frequently documented because greater effort is required to monitor the reproductive success of breeding pairs through time. However, for species whose nests are difficult to locate or access, such as Maui Parrotbills, the presence or absence of fledged young may provide a more accurate measure of breeding success than monitoring nests. During our study, we located and determined the outcome of 30 nests to document nest success, and monitored 106 territories for the presence or absence of fledglings to calculate annual reproductive success. Nest success probability was 19% (N= 30) and seasonal nest success was 46%. During our monitoring efforts, 49 of 106 breeding pairs produced a single fledged young. Because parrotbills typically have single egg clutches and only re-nest after nests fail, the presence or absence of a fledgling is an indication of a pair's overall reproductive success for a breeding season. Based on the number of fledglings per pair, our estimate of annual reproductive success was 46%, confirming our initial productivity estimate from nests. Thus, our results indicate that the two methods, determining annual reproductive success by monitoring fledglings and calculating nest success, provide similar estimates of annual productivity for Maui Parrotbills. Based on our estimates, the parrotbill population appears to be demographically stable. However, our productivity estimate was based only on the population at Hanawi, an area representing just 3% of the total range of parrotbills. Thus, our results may not accurately reflect the status of parrotbills over their entire range.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/jofo.12003
Uncontrolled keywords: annual reproductive success;demography;nest success;population monitoring
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Jim Groombridge
Date Deposited: 08 May 2015 14:20 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:31 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48314 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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