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The use of pseudotypes to study viruses, virus sero-epidemiology and vaccination

Bentley, Emma, Mather, Stuart, Temperton, Nigel J. (2015) The use of pseudotypes to study viruses, virus sero-epidemiology and vaccination. Vaccine, 33 (26). pp. 2955-2962. ISSN 0264-410X. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

The globalization of the world’s economies, accompanied by increasing international travel, changing climates, altered human behaviour and demographics are leading to the emergence of different viral diseases, many of which are highly pathogenic and hence are considered of great public and animal health importance. To undertake basic research and therapeutic development, many of these viruses require handling by highly trained staff in BSL-3/4 facilities not readily available to the majority of the global R&D community. In order to circumvent the enhanced biosafety requirement, the development of non-pathogenic, replication-defective pseudotyped viruses is an effective and established solution to permit the study of many aspects of virus biology in a low containment BSL-1/2 laboratory. Under the spectre of the unfolding Ebola crisis, this timely conference (the second to be organized by the Viral Pseudotype Unit, www.viralpseudotypeunit.info) discusses the recent advances in pseudotype technology and how it is revolutionizing the study of important human and animal pathogens (human and avian influenza viruses, rabies/lyssaviruses, HIV, Marburg and Ebola viruses). Key topics addressed in this conference include the exploitation of pseudotypes for serology and serosurveillance, immunogenicity testing of current and next-generation vaccines and new pseudotype assay formats (multiplexing, kit development).

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > Medway School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: Nigel Temperton
Date Deposited: 22 Apr 2015 20:26 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:26 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/48036 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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