The distance-time relationship and its use in endurance training and performance

Galbraith, Andy (2015) The distance-time relationship and its use in endurance training and performance. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent,. (Full text available)

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Abstract

The aims of this thesis were to develop a time efficient field test of the distance-time relationship, assess its validity, reliability and sensitivity and utilise the test to monitor and prescribe endurance training in distance runners. Laboratory-based tests of the distance-time relationship often use lengthy recovery periods between trials, resulting in multiple visits and limiting their practical application. A field-based test, completed in a single visit, could improve the utility of the distance-time relationship. A novel single visit field test comprising of 3 constant-distance trials, separated by a 30-minute recovery, was designed. This test estimates the highest sustainable rate of aerobic metabolism, or critical speed (CS), and the modelled maximum distance performed above CS (D’). When compared to a traditional multi-visit laboratory protocol, field test CS was highly correlated (r=0.89, P0.05) and high typical error (334-1709 s). Non-linear modelling of recovery did not improve the accuracy. A high variability in D’ may in part explain the low predictive ability of the models. The conclusion from this thesis is that the single visit field test is a valid, reliable and sensitive test for CS, which provides a favourable alternative to multi-visit laboratory-based testing.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Uncontrolled keywords: Critical Speed Field testing Laboratory testing Endurance Training Running
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1235 Physiology of sports
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Users 1 not found.
Date Deposited: 09 Apr 2015 11:00 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Jul 2015 15:26 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/47903 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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