An investigation into biometric signature capture device performance and user acceptance

Brockly, Michael and Elliott, Stephen and Burdine, Jarron and Frost, Michael and Riedle, Matthew and Guest, Richard (2014) An investigation into biometric signature capture device performance and user acceptance. In: 2014 International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology (ICCST). IEEE pp. 1-5. ISBN 9781479935307. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1109/CCST.2014.6986970) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CCST.2014.6986970

Abstract

The human signature provides a natural and publically-accepted legally-admissible method for providing authentication to a process. Automatic biometric signature systems assess both the drawn image and the temporal aspects of signature construction, providing enhanced verification rates over and above conventional outcome assessment. To enable the capture of these constructional data requires the use of specialist `tablet' devices. In this paper we explore the enrolment performance using a range of common signature capture devices and investigate the reasons behind user preference. The results show that writing feedback and familiarity with conventional `paper and pen' donation configurations are the primary motivation for user preference. These results inform the choice of signature device from both technical performance and user acceptance viewpoints.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Subjects: T Technology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts
Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts > Image and Information Engineering
Depositing User: Tina Thompson
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2015 12:24 UTC
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2015 11:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/47774 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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