Skip to main content

Facial expressions and eye gaze: fundamental cues for social interactions.

Trojano, Luigi, Ponari, Marta, Conson, Massimiliano (2011) Facial expressions and eye gaze: fundamental cues for social interactions. In: Neural Nets WIRN11. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications , 234. pp. 220-227. IOSpress ISBN 978-1-60750-971-4. E-ISBN 978-1-60750-972-1. (doi:10.3233/978-1-60750-972-1-220) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.iospress.nl/book/neural-nets-wirn11/

Abstract

We, as humans beings, draw inferences about others' emotions, intentions, and state of mind to deduce their mental states and intentions. Analogously, by observing where other individuals gaze at, we grasp their focus of interest as we know that people tend to look at what they like and look away from what they dislike. Recognition of facial expression is related to functioning of specific mechanisms and brain structures, among which the amygdala plays a pivotal role. It is currently debated whether the very mechanisms and neural structures are responsible for emotion recognition and production, but data on brain-damaged patients would indicate that a defect in recognizing facial expressions can be independent from deficits in producing the same expressions. This neuropsychological dissociation calls for future studies to clarify mechanisms related to production and recognition of emotions. As regards eye gaze, development of gaze perception in infants allows understanding of other people's intentions and mental states. Several developmental disorders are related to impairments in processing other's gaze as in the case of autism, but recent behavioral data show that processing of eye gaze and facial expressions is highly variable even in normal individuals, and can be modulated by factors such as high levels of trait anxiety, autistic-like traits or introversion.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
DOI/Identification number: 10.3233/978-1-60750-972-1-220
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Marta Ponari
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2015 11:42 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:13 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/47207 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Ponari, Marta: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7658-8360
  • Depositors only (login required):