Converting ceria polyhedral nanoparticles into single-crystal nanospheres

Feng, X. and Sayle, D.C. and Wang, Z.L. and Paras, M.S. and Santora, B. and Sutorik, A.C. and Sayle, T.X.T. and Yang, Y. and Ding, Y. and Wang, X. and Her, Y.-S. (2006) Converting ceria polyhedral nanoparticles into single-crystal nanospheres. Science, 312 (5779). pp. 1504-1508. ISSN 00368075 (ISSN). (doi:https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1125767) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1125767

Abstract

Ceria nanopartides are one of the key abrasive materials for chemical-mechanical planarization of advanced integrated circuits. However, ceria nanoparticles synthesized by existing techniques are irregularly faceted, and they scratch the silicon wafers and increase defect concentrations. We developed an approach for large-scale synthesis of single-crystal ceria nanospheres that can reduce the polishing defects by 80% and increase the silica removal rate by 50%, facilitating precise and reliable mass-manufacturing of chips for nanoelectronics. We doped the ceria system with titanium, using flame temperatures that facilitate crystallization of the ceria yet retain the titania in a molten state. In conjunction with molecular dynamics simulation, we show that under these conditions, the inner ceria core evolves in a single-crystal spherical shape without faceting, because throughout the crystallization it is completely encapsulated by a molten 1- to 2-nanometer shell of titania that, in liquid state, minimizes the surface energy. The principle demonstrated here could be applied to other oxide systems.

Item Type: Article
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: LA - English [Field not mapped to EPrints] J2 - Science [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Ferro Corporation, 7500 East Pleasant Vally Road, Independence, OH 44131, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Cranfield University, Defense Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham, Swindon SN6 8LA, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Department of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, College of Engineering, Peking University, 100871 Beijing, China [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100080, China [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Nanocerox, Inc., 712 State Circle, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - James Hardie Building Products, 10901 Elm Avenue, Fontana, CA 92337, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] DB - Scopus [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Uncontrolled keywords: Abrasives, Computer simulation, Crystal defects, Crystallization, Interfacial energy, Molten materials, Silicon wafers, Single crystals, Synthesis (chemical), Titanium, Ceria system, Chemical-mechanical planarization, Liquid state, Polishing defects, Single-crystal spherical shape, Nanostructured materials, nanoparticle, oxide, silicon, titanium, crystal, crystallization, energy, molecular analysis, silicon, surface energy, accuracy, article, chemical modification, crystal structure, crystallization, electronics, energy, melting point, molecular dynamics, priority journal, reliability, simulation, temperature dependence
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Functional Materials Group
Depositing User: Dean Sayle
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2015 16:29 UTC
Last Modified: 17 May 2016 12:24 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/46798 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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