Skip to main content

Cellular interaction and toxicity depend on physicochemical properties and surface modification of redox-active nanomaterials

Dowding, J.M., Das, S., Kumar, A., Dosani, T., McCormack, R., Gupta, A., Sayle, T.X.T., Sayle, D.C., Von Kalm, L., Seal, S., and others. (2013) Cellular interaction and toxicity depend on physicochemical properties and surface modification of redox-active nanomaterials. ACS Nano, 7 (6). pp. 4855-4868. ISSN 1936-0851. (doi:10.1021/nn305872d) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0...

Abstract

The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exist regarding the toxicity of CNPs. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CNPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physicochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs using identical precursors through a wet chemical process but using different oxidizer/reducer; H 2O2 (CNP1), NH4OH (CNP2), or hexamethylenetetramine (HMT-CNP1). Physicochemical properties of these CNPs were extensively studied and found to be different depending on the preparation methods. Unlike CNP1 and CNP2, HMT-CNP1 was readily taken into endothelial cells and the aggregation can be visualized using light microscopy. Exposure to HMT-CNP1 also reduced cell viability at a 10-fold lower concentration than CNP1 or CNP2. Surprisingly, exposure to HMT-CNP1 led to substantial decreases in ATP levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that HMT-CNP1 exhibited substantial ATPase (phosphatase) activity. Though CNP2 also exhibits ATPase activity, CNP1 lacked ATPase activity. The difference in catalytic (ATPase) activity of different CNPs preparation may be due to differences in their morphology and oxygen extraction energy. These results suggest that the combination of increased uptake and ATPase activity of HMT-CNP1 may underlie the biomechanism of the toxicity of this preparation of CNPs and may suggest that ATPase activity should be considered when synthesizing CNPs for use in biomedical applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1021/nn305872d
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: LA - English [Field not mapped to EPrints] J2 - ACS Nano [Field not mapped to EPrints] C2 - 23668322 [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Burnett School of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Advance Material Processing Analysis Center, Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NZ, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, United States [Field not mapped to EPrints] DB - Scopus [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Uncontrolled keywords: cerium oxide nanoparticles, nanoparticle-cell interaction, phosphatase activity, surface modification, toxicity, Biomedical applications, Cerium oxide nanoparticle, Chemical and biologicals, nanoparticle-cell interaction, Phosphatase activity, Physicochemical property, Therapeutic potentials, Wet chemical process, Biological materials, Endothelial cells, Medical applications, Nanoparticles, Phosphatases, Surface treatment, Synthesis (chemical), Toxicity, Catalyst activity, adenosine triphosphatase, adenosine triphosphate, ammonium hydroxide, ceric oxide, cerium, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxide, methenamine, nanoparticle, phosphatase, water, article, catalysis, chemistry, cytology, drug effect, human, intracellular space, metabolism, oxidation reduction reaction, particle size, physical chemistry, precipitation, structure activity relation, surface property, umbilical vein endothelial cell, Adenosine Triphosphatases, Adenosine Triphosphate, Catalysis, Cerium, Chemical Precipitation, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Hydroxides, Intracellular Space, Methenamine, Nanoparticles, Oxidation-Reduction, Particle Size, Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases, Physicochemical Processes, Structure-Activity Relationship, Surface Properties, Water
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Functional Materials Group
Depositing User: Dean Sayle
Date Deposited: 27 Jan 2015 16:35 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:06 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/46772 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):