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Robust study design is as important on the social as it is on the ecological side of applied ecological research

St. John, Freya A.V., Keane, Aidan M., Jones, Julia P.G., Milner-Gulland, E. J. (2014) Robust study design is as important on the social as it is on the ecological side of applied ecological research. Journal of Applied Ecology, 51 (6). pp. 1479-1485. ISSN 0021-8901. (doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12352)

Abstract

1. The effective management of natural systems often requires resource users to change their behaviour. This has led to many applied ecologists using research tools developed by social scientists. This comes with challenges as ecologists often lack relevant disciplinary training. 2. Using an example from the current issue of Journal of Applied Ecology that investigated how conservation interventions influenced conservation outcomes, we discuss the challenges of conducting interdisciplinary science. We illustrate our points using examples from research investigating the role of law enforcement and outreach activities in limiting illegal poaching and the application of the theory of planned behaviour to conservation. 3. Synthesis and applications. Interdisciplinary research requires equal rigour to be applied to ecological and social aspects. Researchers with a natural science background need to access expertise and training in the principles of social science research design and methodology, in order to permit a more balanced interdisciplinary understanding of social–ecological systems

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/1365-2664.12352
Uncontrolled keywords: human behaviour, interdisciplinary science, law enforcement, social science, social-ecological systems, theory of planned behaviour, training
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: F.A.V. St-John
Date Deposited: 15 Dec 2014 12:07 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 13:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/46123 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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