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Commentary: An analysis of the East Kent Outcome System for use in intermediate care

Abrahamson, V. (2009) Commentary: An analysis of the East Kent Outcome System for use in intermediate care. Review of: An analysis of the East Kent Outcome System for use in intermediate care by Murphy, A. and Logan, P.. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 16 (9). pp. 482-487. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:45640)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

Aims: Intermediate care is a multiprofessional rehabilitation service aimed at helping people to remain in their own homes and to avoid hospital admission. Historically, however, each profession of the rehabilitation team has set their own goals with the client. This study aimed to identify and test the feasibility of using a goal attainment outcome measure that the whole intermediate care team could adopt; if successful, this would enable combined goals and thus a more efficient service. Methods: A literature review was carried out to identify a suitable and appropriate goal attainment outcome measure. The East Kent Outcome System (EKOS) was chosen and adopted by four intermediate care teams in Nottingham City Primary Care Trust, UK. An audit of EKOS record forms was then conducted in 2008, which looked at EKOS goal summary records completed by all members of the multidisciplinary team. Findings: EKOS goal summary records were completed for 334 service users who were receiving rehabilitation either at home or in a residential care setting over this 1-year period. The total number of goals set for this population was 1061, with an average of three goals per service user. Of these goals, 79% were fully achieved and 13% were not achieved. Of the goals not achieved, the most common reason was that people's health had deteriorated. Conclusions: The EKOS can be used with success by intermediate care services to quantify the goal setting process and provide a consistent, systematic method of writing and recording goals.

Item Type: Review
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 01 Dec 2014 14:08 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 13:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/45640 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Abrahamson, V.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1169-9457
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