Any of them will do: In-group identification, out-group entitativity, and gang membership as predictors of group based retribution

Vasquez, Eduardo A. and Wenborne, Lisa and Peers, Madeline and Alleyne, Emma and Ellis, Kirsty (2015) Any of them will do: In-group identification, out-group entitativity, and gang membership as predictors of group based retribution. Aggressive Behavior, 41 (3). pp. 242-252. ISSN 0096-140X. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21581) (Full text available)

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Abstract

Members of street gangs can engage in group-based or vicarious retribution, which occurs when a member of a group aggresses against out-group members in retaliation for a previous attack against the in-group, even if the avenging person was not victimized and the targets of revenge were not directly involved in the original attack. In non-gang populations, the degree of identification with an in-group and perceptions of out-group entitativity, the perception of an out-group as bonded or unified, are important contributors to group-based aggression. The link between these factors and group-based aggression, however, has not been examined in the context of street gangs. The current study assessed the relationship among in-group identification, perceptions of out-group entitativity, and the willingness to retaliate against members of rival groups who did not themselves attack the in-group among juvenile gang and non-gang members in London. Our results showed the predicted membership (gang/non-gang) x in-group identification x entitativity interaction. Decomposition of the three-way interaction by membership revealed a significant identification x entitativity interaction for gang, but not for non-gang members. More specifically, gang members who identify more strongly with their gang and perceived a rival group as high on entitativity were more willing to retaliate against any of them. In addition, entitativity was a significant predictor of group-based aggression after controlling for gender, in-group identification, and gang membership. Our results are consistent with socio-psychological theories of group-based aggression and support the proposal that such theories are applicable for understanding gang-related violence.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre of Research & Education in Forensic Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Eduardo Vasquez
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2014 13:20 UTC
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2017 08:45 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/45047 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Vasquez, Eduardo A.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7634-2689
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