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The efficacy of a Mediterranean type diet on symptoms of osteoarthritis – a pilot study.

Davison, Glen, Dyer, Jade, Marcora, Samuele Maria, Mauger, Alexis R. (2014) The efficacy of a Mediterranean type diet on symptoms of osteoarthritis – a pilot study. In: Nutrition Society Annual Meeting. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:44935)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a group of chronic, painful, disabling conditions affecting synovial joints where the pathology includes damage and loss of articular cartilage, irregular remodelling and erosion of sub-articular bone, synovial distension and inflammation(1). Whilst current management strategies include exercise, weight loss and pharmacological therapies, there is evidence to suggest that particular food sources consistent with a Mediterranean type diet (e.g. rich in omega-3 fatty acid) may slow the pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases(2) and moderate markers of inflammation(3). Consequently, following a diet which is plant based, favours olive oil over animal fats, and is high in fibre, vegetables, and fruits, combined with a low intake of foods which are associated with increased inflammation (e.g. meat, dairy, fat and sugar) may reduce joint degradation and inflammation associated with OA. The primary aim of the present pilot study was to assess whether following a Mediterranean type diet would moderate the physiological and perceptual symptoms of participants diagnosed with OA.

Participants in the EXP group demonstrated lower levels of sCOMP from pre- to post-intervention (pre- = 14.1 ± 4.9 U/L; post- = 13.1 ± 5.2 U/L, Cohen's d = 0.413), although this was not significant (p > 0.05). Participants in the CON group experienced no change in sCOMP from pre- to post-intervention (pre- = 9.6 ± 1.4 U/L post- = 10.0 ± 2.4 U/L, Cohen's d = -0.154). None of the components of the AIMS2 questionnaire were changed over the 4-month study in the CON group, but the Affect component significantly decreased by 19% from pre- to post dietary intervention (p = 0.02) in the EXP group.

2. Knott, Avery NC, Hollander AP, et al. (2011) Osteoarthritis Cartilage 19, 1150-1157.

3. Dean E & Hansen RG (2012) Arthritis 2012, 1-28.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Poster)
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Glen Davison
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2014 21:39 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/44935 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Davison, Glen: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-0074
Mauger, Alexis R.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6685-5800
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