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Evolving Biological Systems: Evolutionary Pressure to Inefficiency

Chu, Dominique, Barnes, David J. (2014) Evolving Biological Systems: Evolutionary Pressure to Inefficiency. In: ALIFE 14: The Fourteenth Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems. 14. pp. 89-96. MIT Press (doi:10.7551/978-0-262-32621-6-ch016)

Abstract

The evolution of quantitative details (i.e. “parameter values”) of biological systems is highly under-researched. We use evolutionary algorithms to co-evolve parameters for a generic but biologically plausible topological differential equation model of nutrient uptake. In our model, evolving cells compete for a finite pool of nutrient resources. From our investigations it emerges that the choice of values is very important for the properties of the biological system. Our analysis also shows that clonal populations that are not subject to competition from other species best grow at a very slow rate. However, if there is co-evolutionary pressure, that is, if a population of clones has to compete with other cells, then the fast growth is essential, so as not to leave resources to the competitor. We find that this strategy, while favoured evolutionarily, is inef- ficient from an energetic point of view, that is less growth is achieved per unit of input nutrient. We conclude, that competition can lead to an evolutionary pressure towards inefficiency.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
DOI/Identification number: 10.7551/978-0-262-32621-6-ch016
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General) > Q335 Artificial intelligence
Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming,
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing > Computational Intelligence Group
Depositing User: Dominique Chu
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2014 10:35 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 13:34 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/44781 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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