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T6?Impact Of Environmental Differences In The Prevalence Of Airway Dysfunction In Elite Athletes: Gb Boxing Vs. Gb Swimming

Levai, Irisz, Dickinson, John W., Hull, James, Loosmore, Mike, Greenwell, Jon, Whyte, Greg (2014) T6?Impact Of Environmental Differences In The Prevalence Of Airway Dysfunction In Elite Athletes: Gb Boxing Vs. Gb Swimming. Thorax, 69 (2). ISSN 0040-6376. (doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2014-206260.6) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:44671)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thoraxjnl-2014-206260.6

Abstract

Objectives Exercising in a provocative environment (e.g. indoor swimming pool) at sustained high minute ventilation rates may increase the prevalence of airway dysfunction in athletic populations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of environmental differences in the prevalence of airway dysfunction in two cohorts of elite GB athletes.

Results The prevalence of airway dysfunction was greater in elite swimmers (70%) than boxers (8%) (p < 0.001) (Figure 1). The EVH assessment process revealed missed and incorrect diagnosis of airway dysfunction; specifically 65% (17 of 26) of those with airway dysfunction had no prior diagnosis of asthma or exercise induced bronchoconstriction. Moreover, a prior diagnosis of asthma was not supported by testing in 9% (4 of 46) of the athletes. These athletes were prescribed one or a combination of short-acting ?2-agonists, long-acting ?2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids. Neither symptoms nor baseline lung function were predictive of a positive EVH-challenge in swimmers. No correlation between change in lung function or airway dysfunction and FeNO value.

Conclusions The prevalence of airway dysfunction was nine fold greater in elite swimmers when compared with boxers. This finding emphasises the high proportion of EVH-positive elite swimmers and the importance of strategies needed to ensure their respiratory health is optimised. These results also suggest that airway dysfunction is not only related to intensity and frequency of exertional hyperpnoea but also environmental conditions.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2014-206260.6
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports medicine
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: John Dickinson
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2014 16:00 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/44671 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Dickinson, John W.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1824-7402
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