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Luba-Lunda States

Macola, Giacomo (2015) Luba-Lunda States. In: Mackenzie, John, ed. The Encyclopedia of Empire. Wiley. ISBN 978-1-118-44064-3. (doi:10.1002/9781118455074.wbeoe060) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118455074.wbeoe060

Abstract

Centralized state systems have existed among the Luba and Lunda peoples of present-day southern Democratic Republic of Congo since at least 1700. Over the course of the 18th century, both polities took on an imperial character, as the political, economic, and cultural networks that revolved around them came to overlay large expanses of the central African savannah. Luba and Lunda elites, however, proved ill-equipped to deal with the growth of the trade in slaves and ivory in the closing decades of the 19th century. The collapse of the Luba and Lunda spheres of imperial control on the eve of European colonialism ushered in an era of widespread political turmoil and social violence.

Item Type: Book section
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/9781118455074.wbeoe060
Uncontrolled keywords: Central Africa; Luba; Lunda; slavery; trade
Subjects: A General Works
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Giacomo Macola
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2014 13:49 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 13:29 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/44499 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Macola, Giacomo: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6119-2016
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