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Changing the Ties That Bind? The Emerging Roles and Identities of General Practitioners and Managers in the New Clinical Commissioning Groups in the English NHS

Segar, Judith, Checkland, Kath, Coleman, Anna, McDermott, Imelda, Harrison, Stephen, Peckham, Stephen (2014) Changing the Ties That Bind? The Emerging Roles and Identities of General Practitioners and Managers in the New Clinical Commissioning Groups in the English NHS. SAGE Open, 4 (4). E-ISSN 2158-2440. (doi:10.1177/2158244014554203) (KAR id:44232)

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Abstract

The English National Health Service (NHS) is undergoing significant reorganization following the 2012 Health and Social Care Act. Key to these changes is the shift of responsibility for commissioning services from Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to general practitioners (GPs) working together in Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs). This article is based on an empirical study that examined the development of emerging CCGs in eight case studies across England between September 2011 and June 2012. The findings are based on interviews with GPs and managers, observations of meetings, and reading of related documents. Scott’s notion that institutions are constituted by three pillars—the regulative, normative, and cognitive–cultural—is explored here. This approach helps to understand the changing roles and identities of doctors and managers implicated by the present reforms. This article notes the far reaching changes in the regulative pillar and questions how these changes will affect the normative and cultural–cognitive pillars.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/2158244014554203
Uncontrolled keywords: England, NHS, institution theory, Clinical Commissioning Groups, GPs, managers
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R729 Types of medical practice > R729.5.G4 General practice
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Stephen Peckham
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2014 14:56 UTC
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2020 16:36 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/44232 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Peckham, Stephen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7002-2614
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