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Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse Improves 1.5 h Run Performance: Is There a Dose-Effect?

Wright, B.F., Davison, Glen (2013) Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse Improves 1.5 h Run Performance: Is There a Dose-Effect? International Journal of Exercise Science, 6 (4). pp. 328-340. ISSN 1939-795X. (KAR id:43968)

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http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/ijes/vol6/iss4/8/

Abstract

There is a substantial body of recent evidence showing ergogenic effects of carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinsing on endurance performance. However, there is a lack of research on the dose-effect and the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two different concentrations (6% and 12% weight/volume, w/v) on 90 minute treadmill running performance. Seven active males took part in one familiarization trial and three experimental trials (90-minute self-paced performance trials). Solutions (placebo, 6% or 12% CHO-electrolyte solution, CHO-E) were rinsed in the mouth at the beginning, and at 15, 30 and 45 minutes during the run. The total distance covered was greater during the CHO-E trials (6%, 14.6 ± 1.7 km; 12%, 14.9 ± 1.6 km) compared to the placebo trial (13.9 ± 1.7 km, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the 6% and 12% trials (P > 0.05). There were no between trial differences (P > 0.05) in ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and feeling or arousal ratings suggesting that the same subjective ratings were associated with higher speeds in the CHO-E trials. Enhanced performance in the CHO-E trials was due to higher speeds in the last 30 minutes even though rinses were not provided during the final 45 minutes, suggesting the effects persist for at least 20-45 minutes after rinsing. In conclusion, mouth rinsing with a CHO-E solution enhanced endurance running performance but there does not appear to be a dose-response effect with the higher concentration (12%) compared to a standard 6% solution.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Mouth wash, treadmill running, nutrition, endurance
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Glen Davison
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2014 22:28 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/43968 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Davison, Glen: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-0074
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