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Psychophysiological and stress responses to competition in team sport coaches: an exploratory study.

Hudson, J, Davison, Glen, Robinson, P (2013) Psychophysiological and stress responses to competition in team sport coaches: an exploratory study. Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, 23 (5). e279-85. ISSN 1600-0838. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:43966)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/sms.120...

Abstract

Examinations of stress in coaches have mainly been qualitative and focused on chronic stressors. This exploratory study examined stress responses in coaches during competition, including psychological and physiological indices. Using reversal theory, we examined metamotivational state profiles during competition. Ten male team sport coaches (mean age 39.8 ± 13.12 years) reported levels of subjective stress, pleasant and unpleasant emotions, metamotivational state, and provided saliva samples, on a competition day: 15 min prior to the pre-match team talk; start of the match; end of the first half; start of the second half, and end of the match, then at equivalent times on a noncompetition day. Saliva samples were assayed for alpha-amylase activity. On competition day, alpha-amylase activity was significantly higher, as were subjective stress, arousal, and unpleasant emotions. Prior to and during active play, participants were mainly in the conformist, alloic (other-oriented), and mastery states, and at the end of the match, in the telic and sympathy states. Only 22 metamotivational state reversals were observed, mostly at the start and end of the match. The elevated levels of subjective stress, alpha-amylase activity, and unpleasant emotions suggest that educational programs may be useful for some coaches to manage psychological states during competition.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Glen Davison
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2014 22:12 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/43966 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Davison, Glen: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-0074
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