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Sex-related shape dimorphism in the human radiocarpal and midcarpal joints

Kivell, Tracy L., Guimont, Isabelle, Wall, Christine E (2013) Sex-related shape dimorphism in the human radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. Anatomical Record, 296 (1). pp. 19-30. ISSN 1932-8494. (doi:10.1002/ar.22609) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

Previous research has revealed significant size differences between human male and female carpal bones but it is unknown if there are significant shape differences as well. This study investigated sex-related shape variation and allometric patterns in five carpal bones that make up the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints in modern humans. We found that many aspects of carpal shape (76% of all variables quantified) were similar between males and females, despite variation in size. However, 10 of the shape ratios were significantly different between males and females, with at least one significant shape difference observed in each carpal bone. Within-sex standard major axis regressions (SMA) of the numerator (i.e., the linear variables) on the denominator (i.e., the geometric mean) for each significantly different shape ratio indicated that most linear variables scaled with positive allometry in both males and females, and that for eight of the shape ratios, sex-related shape variation is associated with statistically similar sex-specific scaling relationships. Only the length of the scaphoid body and the height of the lunate triquetrum facet showed a significantly higher SMA slope in females compared with males. These findings indicate that the significant differences in the majority of the shape ratios are a function of subtle (i.e., not statistically significant) scaling differences between males and females. There are a number of potential developmental, functional, and evolutionary factors that may cause sex-related shape differences in the human carpus. The results highlight the potential for subtle differences in scaling to result in functionally significant differences in shape.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/ar.22609
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Q Science > QM Human anatomy
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Depositing User: Tracy Kivell
Date Deposited: 29 Oct 2014 22:13 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2019 11:41 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/43698 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Kivell, Tracy L.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5087-0897
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