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The Self-Paced VO2max Test to Assess Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Highly Trained Runners.

Hogg, James S., Hopker, James G., Mauger, Alexis R. (2014) The Self-Paced VO2max Test to Assess Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Highly Trained Runners. International journal of sports physiology and performance, 10 (2). pp. 172-177. ISSN 1555-0265. E-ISSN 1555-0273. (doi:10.1123/ijspp.2014-0041) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:43633)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2014-0041

Abstract

PURPOSE

The novel self-paced maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test (SPV) may be a more suitable alternative to traditional maximal tests for elite athletes due to the ability to self-regulate pace. This study aimed to examine whether the SPV can be administered on a motorised treadmill.

METHODS

Fourteen highly trained male distance runners performed a standard GXT, an incline-based SPV (SPVinc) and a speed-based SPV (SPVsp). The GXT included a plateau verification stage. Both SPV protocols included 5 x 2 minute stages [and a plateau verification stage] and allowed for self-pacing based on fixed increments of rating of perceived exertion (RPE): 11, 13, 15, 17 and 20. The participants varied their speed/incline on the treadmill by moving between different marked 'zones', in which the tester would then adjust the intensity.

RESULTS

There was no significant difference (p=0.319, ES=0.21) in the VO2max achieved in the SPVsp (67.6 ± 3.6 mL·kg-1·min-1, 95%CI = 65.6 - 69.7 mL·kg-1·min-1) compared to that achieved in the GXT (68.6 ± 6.0 mL·kg-1·min-1, CI = 65.1 - 72.1 mL·kg-1·min-1). Participants achieved a significantly higher VO2max in the SPVinc (70.6 ± 4.3 mL·kg-1·min-1, 95%CI = 68.1 - 73.0 mL·kg-1·min-1) compared to both the GXT (p=0.027, ES=0.39) and SPVsp (p=0.001, ES=0.76).

CONCLUSIONS

The SPVsp protocol produces similar VO2max values to those obtained in the GXT and may represent a more appropriate and athlete-friendly test which is more orientated towards the variable speed found in competitive sport.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0041
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports medicine
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: James Hopker
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2014 20:01 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/43633 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hopker, James G.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4786-7037
Mauger, Alexis R.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6685-5800
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