Skip to main content

Water-compatible silica sol–gel molecularly imprinted polymer as a potential delivery system for the controlled release of salicylic acid

Li, Bin, Xu, Jingjing, Hall, Andrew J., Haupt, Karsten, Bui, Bernadette Tse Sum (2014) Water-compatible silica sol–gel molecularly imprinted polymer as a potential delivery system for the controlled release of salicylic acid. Journal of Molecular Recognition, 27 (9). pp. 559-565. ISSN 0952-3499. E-ISSN 1099-1352. (doi:10.1002/jmr.2383) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmr.2383

Abstract

Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for salicylic acid were synthesized and evaluated in aqueous environments in the aim to apply them as drug delivery carriers. One organic MIP and one inorganic MIP based on the sol–gel process were synthesized. The organic MIP was prepared by radical polymerization using the stoichiometric functional monomer, 1-(4-vinylphenyl)-3-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)urea, which can establish strong electrostatic interactions with the –COOH of salicylic acid. The sol–gel MIP was prepared with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and trimethoxyphenylsilane, as functional monomers and tetraethyl orthosilicate as the crosslinker. While the organic MIPs bound the target specifically in acetonitrile, they exhibited lower binding in the presence of water, although the imprinting factor increased under these conditions, due to reduced non-specific binding. The sol–gel MIP has a high specificity and capacity for the drug in ethanol, a solvent compatible with drug formulation and biomedical applications. In vitro release profiles of the polymers in water were evaluated, and the results were modelled by Fick's law of diffusion and the power law. Analysis shows that the release mechanism was predominantly diffusion-controlled.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/jmr.2383
Uncontrolled keywords: Molecular imprinting
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > Medway School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: Andrew Hall
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2014 10:56 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 13:13 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/43447 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):