Nice guys finish first: The competitive altruism hypothesis.

Hardy, Charlie L. and Van Vugt, Mark (2006) Nice guys finish first: The competitive altruism hypothesis. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32 (10). pp. 1402-1413. ISSN 0146-1672. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167206291006

Abstract

Three experimental studies examined the relationship between altruistic behavior and the emergence of status hierarchies within groups. In each study, group members were confronted with a social dilemma in which they could either benefit themselves or their group. Study I revealed that in a reputation environment when contributions were public, people were more altruistic. In both Studies I and 2, the most altruistic members gained the highest status in their g-roup and were most frequently preferred as cooperative interaction partners. Study 3 showed that as the costs of altruism increase, the status rewards also increase. These results support the premise at the heart Of competitive altruism: Individuals may behave altruistically for reputation reasons because selective benefits (associated with status) accrue to the generous.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Ros Beeching
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2008 11:42
Last Modified: 07 May 2014 10:10
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4324 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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