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Screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care: extending the existing evidence base via the UK SIPS trial

Kaner, E., Bland, M., Cassidy, P., Coulton, Simon, Deluca, P., Drummond, C., Gilvarry, E., Godfrey, C., Heather, N., Myles, J., and others. (2010) Screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care: extending the existing evidence base via the UK SIPS trial. In: Alcoholism-Clinical And Experimental Research. 295A , 34 (6). (doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01211.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:42710)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01211.x

Abstract

There have been many trials of screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary care. Most

drinkers. Despite this considerable evidence-base, key questions remain including: the

required intensity of brief intervention. This trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and costeffectiveness

intervention in routine primary care. GPs and nurses from 24 practices across the North East,

3 intervention conditions: a leaflet-only control group; brief structured advice; and brief lifestyle

use the modified single item (M-SASQ) or FAST screening tool. To inform the screening

views on which health conditions and/or contexts were most suitable for identifying heavy

or universal screening. Practitioners (n = 111) preferred targeted to universal screening (55%

conditions were mental health, gastrointestinal problems, hypertension and accidents (rated

30% (n = 900) screened positively for heavy drinking and 84% (n = 754) consented to

screened positively) was significantly higher for targeted screening (36%) compared to

(mean age 52 vs. 49), male (56% vs. 41%), Caucasian (83% vs. 81%) and less well

characteristics of patients identified by each screening strategy and the relative efficiency of

be more efficient than universal screening, key groups of patients may be missed by this

strategy.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01211.x
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV5001 Alcoholism and intemperance
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2014 10:55 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42710 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Coulton, Simon: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7704-3274
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