Screening and Brief Alcohol Intervention in Routine Primary Care in the UK: SIPS Trial Outcomes at Six Months

Kaner, E. and Bland, M. and Cassidy, P. and Coulton, Simon and Deluca, P. and Drummond, C. and Gilvarry, E. and Godfrey, C. and Heather, N. and Myles, J. and Newbury-Birch, D. and Oyefeso, A. and Parrott, S. and Perryman, K. and Phillips, T.J. and Shenker, D. and Shepherd, J. (2010) Screening and Brief Alcohol Intervention in Routine Primary Care in the UK: SIPS Trial Outcomes at Six Months. In: World Congress on International-Society-for-Biomedical-Research-on-Alcoholism, SEP 13-16, 2010, Paris, France. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01292_3.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01292_3...

Abstract

Background: Over the past 25 years, many trials of screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary care have reported positive effects in terms of reducing excessive drinking. However, it is still not clear how applicable this evidence is to routine primary care. In addition, there is a need to identify an efficient screening strategy for busy medical practices. Lastly, the evidence-base in unclear on whether brief structured advice or motivational counselling is the required form of brief intervention to produce positive behaviour change. This SIPS trial is a pragmatic evaluation based in regular primary care practices and involving general practitioners and nurses who deliver screening and brief alcohol intervention during their day-to-day work The aim of the trial is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of screening to identify excessive drinkers and differing intensities of brief intervention to reduce excessive drinking in routine practice. Method: GPs and nurses from 24 practices in England were recruited. Practices were randomly allocated to one of three brief intervention conditions: a leaflet-only control group (n = 8); five minutes of brief structured advice (n = 8); and twenty minutes of brief lifestyle counselling (n = 8). Practices were additionally randomised to either universal or targeted screening and to use either a modified single item (M-SASQ) or the FAST screening tool. Practices in each of the three intervention conditions were asked to recruit at least 31 hazardous or harmful drinkers who received a short baseline assessment followed by brief intervention. Patients were subsequently followed up at six and twelve months after the intervention. Results: Six month follow-up data will be completed by February 2010. With just one month remaining, the follow-up rate is currently 86% and has included 560 patients. The majority of the follow-up work has been via telephone although postal and email follow-up have also been used. Discussion: The presentation will report not only drinking outcomes following brief intervention but also quality of life measures and health service use data. The findings will answer the key question of whether brief intervention is effective in routine practice and if structured advice is sufficient to change drinking behaviour in non-treatment seeking patients or if motivational counselling is more impactful. Finally the costeffectiveness of these approaches will be outlined.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV5001 Alcohol use and miuse
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2014 14:57 UTC
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2014 14:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42683 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):