Networks, counter-networks and political socialisation – paths and barriers to high-cost/risk activism in the 2010/11 student protests against fees and cuts

Hensby, Alexander (2014) Networks, counter-networks and political socialisation – paths and barriers to high-cost/risk activism in the 2010/11 student protests against fees and cuts. Contemporary Social Science: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences, 9 (1). pp. 92-105. ISSN 2158-2041. E-ISSN 2158-205X. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2013.851409) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2013.851409

Abstract

Why might people sympathetic to the goals of a protest campaign choose not to participate? What distinguishes them sociologically from those who do participate? This paper uses the 2010/11 UK student protests as a case study for understanding how contemporary social movements mobilise individuals for high-cost/risk forms of activism participation. The protests saw large-scale regional and national demonstrations take place, along with the formation of a network of simultaneous campus occupations across the UK, presenting a greater scale and diversity of protest participation opportunities than had been seen for a generation. Nevertheless, students' political background and network access remained significant not only for shaping attitudes towards the efficacy and meaningfulness of protest, but also making protest participation appear an ‘available’ option. This paper uses interviews with participating and non-participating students from four UK universities to explore the range of pathways to mobilisation for national demonstrations and campus occupations.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: student movements, protest, participation, social networks
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: N. Gregory
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2014 13:03 UTC
Last Modified: 22 Aug 2014 13:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42649 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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