An examination of the characteristics of different measures of alcohol related attendance in adults presenting to emergency departments

Phillips, T.S., Coulton, Simon, Drummond, C. (2012) An examination of the characteristics of different measures of alcohol related attendance in adults presenting to emergency departments. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 36 (S1). 248A-248A. John Wiley & Sons (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

There is limited analysis of characteristics for different measures of alcohol misuse in attendees of Emergency Departments (ED). We explored the extent to which different measures identified the same or different alcohol related attenders, and characteristics of attendees that were predictive of alcohol misuse. A 24-hour national survey of alcohol-related attendances was conducted in 32 randomly selected EDs in England. Researchers administered a questionnaire, which included the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) and obtained a breath alcohol sample from eligible attendees. 61% (n=1,083) of eligible attendees consented to participate. Four measures were dichotomized as positive or negative for alcohol misuse: Self-reported alcohol-related attendance; FAST score >3; ?80mg/100ml Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) and having at least one alcohol binge in the last week (consumption of 6 (women)/8 (men) or more drinks on one or more days). Statistical analysis included chi-squared tests and stepwise backward selection logistic regression models using Stata 11. 46.7% of attendees were positive on one or more of the measures and 9.5% being positive on all four measures. Of those positive, FAST identified 79.8% of those positive, Binge in the last week, 74.9%, Self report, 24.1% and BAC >=80mg/100ml, 20.4% respectively. Being younger, single, not an owner occupier, suffered an assault, mental health problem, physical injury, involved in a violent incident, incident where a weapon was used, being injured and having the last drink in a public house were significantly associated with all measures. Regression analysis identified 19 separate variables were predictive of alcohol related attendance across the measures. No single variable was common in being predictive of alcohol related attendance. Being involved in a incident involving a weapon and attending because of mental health issues were predictive of being FAST positive, intoxicated and binge in the last week. Location of the incident being a public house was predictive of self-reported alcohol related attendance, intoxication and binge in the last week. There is considerable overlap in the characteristics that are associated with different measures of alcohol related attendance. Logistic regression was predictive of different characteristics for each measure. These findings suggest that multidimensional measures provide the most comprehensive means of identifying of alcohol misuse in ED.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Poster)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV5001 Alcohol use and miuse
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2014 15:40 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:59 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42600 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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