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Pretrial publicity, judicial remedies, and jury bias.

Kramer, Geoffrey P., Kerr, Norbert L., Carroll, John S. (1990) Pretrial publicity, judicial remedies, and jury bias. Law and Human Behavior, 14 (5). pp. 409-438. ISSN 0147-7307. E-ISSN 1573-661X. (doi:10.1007/bf01044220) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf01044220

Abstract

Examined the effectiveness of 3 remedies (judicial instructions, deliberation, and continuance) in combating the negative impact of different types of pretrial publicity on juror judgment. Two different types of pretrial publicity were examined: factual publicity (incriminating information about the defendant) and emotional publicity (information likely to arouse negative emotions). 617 adults from the jury rolls and 14 university students served as mock jurors. Neither instructions nor deliberation reduced the impact of either form of publicity; in fact, deliberation strengthened publicity biases. A continuance of several days between exposure to the publicity and viewing the trial served as an effective remedy for the factual publicity but not for the emotional publicity.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/bf01044220
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: M.L. Barnoux
Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2014 10:38 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:58 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42527 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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