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Priming In-Group Favoritism: The Impact of Normative Scripts in the Minimal Group Paradigm

Hertel, Guido, Kerr, Norbert L. (2001) Priming In-Group Favoritism: The Impact of Normative Scripts in the Minimal Group Paradigm. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 37 (4). pp. 316-324. ISSN 0022-1031. (doi:10.1006/jesp.2000.1447) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:42451)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jesp.2000.1447

Abstract

Results of experiments employing the minimal group paradigm (MGP) (Tajfel et al., 1971) have provided evidence that mere categorization can—at least on average—lead to in-group favoritism, i.e., allocating more resources to in-group members than to out-group members. This effect is often explained by sociomotivational processes in which persons favor their own group in order to enhance their social self-esteem (e.g., Tajfel & Turner, 1986). However, in-group favoritism in the MGP can alternatively be explained by assuming that persons simply follow social norms or scripts that are currently accessible and provide behavioral prescriptions for the task at hand. This explanation was tested by experimentally varying the accessibility of behavior scripts with a priming procedure within a MGP. As expected, priming of “loyalty” compared to priming of “equality” led to (a) higher perceptions that loyalty is expected by in-group members, (b) increased in-group favoritism, (c) increased expression of in-group identification. Moreover, while self-esteem ratings were positively correlated with in-group favoritism after priming of loyalty, this relation was reversed after priming of equality.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1006/jesp.2000.1447
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: M.L. Barnoux
Date Deposited: 19 Aug 2014 13:26 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42451 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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