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Having to Take a Stand: The Interactive Effects of Task Framing and Source Status on Attitudes

El-Alayli, A., Park, E. S., Messe, L. A., Kerr, Norbert L. (2002) Having to Take a Stand: The Interactive Effects of Task Framing and Source Status on Attitudes. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 5 (3). pp. 233-248. ISSN 1368-4302. (doi:10.1177/1368430202005003004) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1368430202005003004

Abstract

Some research has found that a minority message source is less persuasive than a majority source on personally relevant issues. In that research, participants were forewarned that they would have to report their attitudinal reactions. We hypothesized that if recipients were given an opinion-irrelevant (recall) task instead, source status would not affect attitudes. Participants were asked to read a strong, outcome-relevant, counterattitudinal persuasive essay presented by a minority or majority source under opinion or recall task directions. The minority was less persuasive than the majority in the opinion task condition, and this effect was mediated by source evaluation and favorable cognitive elaboration. No source status effects emerged in the recall task condition.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/1368430202005003004
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: M.L. Barnoux
Date Deposited: 19 Aug 2014 12:16 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42446 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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