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Test anxiety, working memory, and cognitive performance: Supportive effects of sequential demands

Dutke, Stephan, Stoeber, Joachim (2001) Test anxiety, working memory, and cognitive performance: Supportive effects of sequential demands. Cognition and Emotion, 15 (3). pp. 381-389. ISSN 0269-9931. (doi:10.1080/02699930125922) (KAR id:4244)

Abstract

Substantial evidence suggests that test anxiety is associated with poor performance in complex tasks. Based on the differentiation of coordinative and sequential demands on working memory (Mayr & Kliegl, 1993), two studies examined the effects of sequential demands on the relationship between test anxiety and cognitive performance. Both studies found that high sequential demands had beneficial effects on the speed and accuracy of the performance of test-anxious participants. It is suggested that the more frequent memory updates associated with high sequential demands may represent external processing aids that compensate for the restricted memory capacity of individuals with high test anxiety

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/02699930125922
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Joachim Stoeber
Date Deposited: 09 Jun 2008 16:29 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 09:42 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4244 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)

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