Still the Spectre at the Feast: Comparisons between Peacekeeping and Imperialism in Peacekeeping Studies Today

Cunliffe, Philip (2012) Still the Spectre at the Feast: Comparisons between Peacekeeping and Imperialism in Peacekeeping Studies Today. International Peacekeeping, 19 (4). pp. 426-442. ISSN 1353-3312. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/13533312.2012.709751) (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13533312.2012.709751

Abstract

The sheer ambition and scale of UN peacebuilding today inevitably invokes comparison with historic practices of colonialism and imperialism, from critics and supporters of peacebuilding alike. The legitimacy of post-settlement peacebuilding is often seen to hinge on the question of the extent to which it transcends historic practices of imperialism. This article offers a critique of how these comparisons are made in the extant scholarship, and argues that supporters of peacekeeping deploy an under-theorized and historically one-sided view of imperialism. The article argues that the attempt to flatter peacebuilding by comparison with imperialism fails, and that the theory and history of imperialism still provide a rich resource for both the critique and conceptualization of peacekeeping practice. The article concludes by suggesting how new forms of imperial power can be projected through peacebuilding.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Peacekeeping, United Nations, peacebuilding, imperialism
Subjects: J Political Science
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations > Conflict Analysis Research Centre
Depositing User: Philip Cunliffe
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2014 14:06 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2017 16:37 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42044 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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