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Leadership for health commissioning in the new NHS: exploring the early development of Clinical Commissioning Groups in England

Coleman, A., Segar, J., Checkland, K., McDermott, I., Harrison, S., Peckham, Stephen (2014) Leadership for health commissioning in the new NHS: exploring the early development of Clinical Commissioning Groups in England. Journal of Health Organization and Management, 29 (1). pp. 75-81. ISSN 1477-7266. (doi:10.1108/JHOM-04-2013-0075) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JHOM-04-2013-0075

Abstract

“The upsurge of interest in leadership in the English National Health Service (NHS) is a response to the government’s belief that stronger leadership is needed in the public sector. This is because strong leadership is seen as critical to navigating transition and uncertainty on the scale that is currently seen within the NHS” (Dopson and Mark 2003 p251) These words were written in 2003, but are equally relevant today as the Health and Social Care Act 2012 (HSCA 2012) instigates the most extensive reorganisation of the structure of the National Health Service (NHS) in England to date. The legislation abolished Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs), with the majority of the commissioning budget transferred to 211 newly developing Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) from April 2013. These groups are now partly led by General Practitioners (GPs), and this significant structural change was justified as part of the Governments’ stated desire to create a clinically-driven commissioning system that is more sensitive to the needs of patients. At the same time, other parts of the NHS have undergoing parallel changes, also aimed at increasing clinical leadership of the service (NHSCB 2011a). In this paper we explore the early experiences of those involved with the development of CCGs, looking at how this aspiration towards a ‘clinically-led’ system is playing out in practice. We investigate two leadership approaches previously identified in the literature as being important in the context of major change – responsible guardianship and positive deviancy (Allen and Wade 2011). What follows is divided into five sections. A brief description of the scope and nature of the current changes affecting the English NHS is followed by a brief discussion of relevant literature relating to the concept of ‘leadership’ Our methods will then be described, and the results of the study reported, with a final discussion section exploring the significance of these findings for NHS policy and practice.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1108/JHOM-04-2013-0075
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R729 Types of medical practice > R729.5.G4 General practice
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Stephen Peckham
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2014 13:31 UTC
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2019 12:04 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42030 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Peckham, Stephen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7002-2614
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