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'I know how they must feel': Empathy and judging defendants

Wood, Jane L., James, Mark, Ó Ciardha, Caoilte (2014) 'I know how they must feel': Empathy and judging defendants. The European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context, 6 (1). pp. 37-43. ISSN 1889-1861. (doi:10.5093/ejpalc2014a5)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5093/ejpalc2014a5

Abstract

The current study investigated the effects of state and trait empathy in legal judgments and tested the relationship between trait and state emotion in one hundred and fifty eight students aged 18–59. Assessments were taken of participants’ trait empathy and then state empathy was induced in half the sample. Following this all participants read a trial transcript and made judgments regarding: the verdict decision; the defendant's responsibility for the offense; what would be an appropriate punishment; the likelihood that the offender would offend in the future; and whether the defendant felt remorse for committing the offense. Findings showed that both trait and state empathy predicted attributions of offender remorse. State empathy also predicted judgments of offender responsibility and agreement with verdict decisions in a lenient direction. Findings also showed that state and trait empathy did not interact. The results indicate that trait and state empathy work independently to influence legal judgments and that inducing empathy in decision-makers can impact on trial outcomes above and beyond the facts of the case.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.5093/ejpalc2014a5
Uncontrolled keywords: Empathy; State; Trait; Remorse; Judgments
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre of Research & Education in Forensic Psychology
Depositing User: Jane Wood
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2014 12:31 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:42 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/41544 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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