Processing of first-order motion in marmoset visual cortex is influenced by second-order motion

Barraclough, Nick E. and Tinsley, Chris J. and Webb, Ben S. and Vincent, Christopher J. and Derrington, Andrew M. (2006) Processing of first-order motion in marmoset visual cortex is influenced by second-order motion. Visual Neuroscience, 23 (5). pp. 815-824. ISSN 0952-5238 . (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0952523806230141

Abstract

Moving first-order stimuli and to combined first- and second-order stimuli in order to determine whether first-order motion processing was influenced by second-order motion. Beat stimuli were made by summing two gratings of similar spatial frequency, one of which was static and the other was moving. The beat is the product of a moving sinusoidal carrier (first-order motion) and a moving low-frequency contrast envelope (second-order motion). We compared responses to moving first-order gratings alone with responses to beat patterns with first-order and second-order motion in the same direction as each other, or in opposite directions to each other in order to distinguish first-order and second-order direction-selective responses. In the majority (72%, 67/93) of cells (V1 73%, 45/62; V2 70%, 16/23; third visual complex 75%, 6/8), responses to first-order motion were significantly influenced by the addition of a second-order signal. The second-order envelope was more influential when moving in the opposite direction to the first-order stimulus, reducing first-order direction sensitivity in V1, V2, and the third visual complex. We interpret these results as showing that first-order motion processing through early visual cortex is not separate from second-order motion processing; suggesting that both motion signals are processed by the same system.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: primate; physiology; V1; luminance; contrast
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Ros Beeching
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2008 13:53
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2014 11:26
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4134 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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