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HARKing (Hypothesizing After the Results are Known)

Kerr, Norbert L. (1998) HARKing (Hypothesizing After the Results are Known). HARKing (Hypothesizing After the Results are Known), 2 (3). pp. 196-217. ISSN 1088-8683. E-ISSN 1532-7957. (doi:10.1207/s15327957pspr0203_4) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0203_4

Abstract

This article considers a practice in scientific communication termed HARKing (Hypothesizing After the Results are Known). HARKing is defined as presenting a post hoc hypothesis (i.e., one based on or informed by one's results) in one's research report as if it were, in fact, an a priori hypotheses. Several forms of HARKing are identified and survey data are presented that suggests that at least some forms of HARKing are widely practiced and widely seen as inappropriate. I identify several reasons why scientists might HARK. Then I discuss several reasons why scientists ought not to HARK. It is conceded that the question of whether HARKing's costs exceed its benefits is a complex one that ought to be addressed through research, open discussion, and debate. To help stimulate such discussion (and for those such as myself who suspect that HARKing's costs do exceed its benefits), I conclude the article with some suggestions for deterring HARKing.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1207/s15327957pspr0203_4
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Norbert L Kerr
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2014 21:39 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/41330 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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