Popular Music and Copyright Law in the Sixties

Bellido, Jose (2013) Popular Music and Copyright Law in the Sixties. Journal of Law and Society, 40 (4). pp. 570-595. ISSN 0263-323X. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6478.2013.00641.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6478.2013.00641.x

Abstract

Copyright and its relationship with popular music is one of the most disputed issues amongst music and copyright scholars. While some have accused copyright of being blind (or deaf) to the particularities of popular music, others have defended its significance within the industry. This article contributes to this debate by tracing the networks of connections between lawyers, musicians, and clerks that emerged in a formative period in British pop music (the Sixties). It considers how their collaborative efforts and strategies to present evidence in copyright infringement trials were articulated in an attempt to influence music copyright infringement tests in Britain. By highlighting the concrete geographical and temporal contexts from which these networks emerged and their particular contingencies, the article also casts a new light on the impact of the legal profession on copyright, showing a practice-oriented and historically situated way of observing differences between French and British copyright systems.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: K Law
K Law > K Law (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Law School
Depositing User: Cathy Norman
Date Deposited: 06 May 2014 16:34 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2014 09:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40982 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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